Monthly Archives: June 2013

In A Perfect World – Kodaline

The debut album by Kodaline, titled ‘In A Perfect World’ showcases the band into the music industry, with an album that continues in the same vein as many indie-pop bands that have preceded them. Echoing the styles of the likes of Coldplay, Kodaline show off their talents as song-writers and musicians, and offer a wonderfully crafted album featuring pleasant vocals and wonderful instrumentals. There’s many strong elements at work here which certainly suggest one of the many reasons why Kodaline are becoming a strong upcoming band. Many elements come together in brilliant style to produce what is a very impressive debut release.

‘In A Perfect World’ seems to echo styles of many established bands, such as Coldplay, and to some extent Death Cab for Cutie. There’s a sort of indie-pop element at the core of most of the music on ‘In A Perfect World’, which Kodaline seem to utilize very effectively. There’s some wonderful themes and ideas present in the music, which comes across to create what is a nice and enjoyable music experience. What is nice is how Kodaline seem to be utilizing their talents to create good music, rather than just doing the bare minimum and creating simple and uninspired music which is so often done in the genre. There’s an element of simple honest music that just sounds nice.

For all the elements of ‘In A Perfect World’ that work, it is marred by the somewhat predictable elements the band has used for some of the tracks. Whilst Kodaline have produced an album that is a step above the bog-standard indie-pop/rock experience, it is also a step below those who push themselves to really create something that is interesting and different. ‘In A Perfect World’ is certainly enjoyable and nice sounding, but it seems like a safe-bet by the band, in that they’ve not really tried anything that truly sets them apart from those who have preceded them. The album and it’s tracks are enjoyable, but it feels like Kodaline are perhaps capable of doing just a bit more.

Kodaline haven’t done anything truly wrong on their debut effort, and in fairness to them, most of the elements and styles utilized on the album come together very well. It certainly paves the way for the upcoming band, and suggests what is hopefully, more good things to come from them. Their debut effort is impressive in terms of the crisp clean sound produced by the band, though it does leave a note of wanting just a little bit more from the band themselves. Perhaps this will be something we’ll get to see in the future though. I certainly hope so, otherwise there’s a chance that Kodaline will fall into the hole of typical cliched indie-pop/rock bands. For now though, they’re certainly on the right path.

Album Rating:

  • ★★★★☆  4/5

Selected Songs:

  • Love Like This
  • High Hopes
  • All Comes Down
  • Pray

Kodaline’s debut album ‘In A Perfect World’ is out now.

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Jane 1-11 – Harold Budd

The ambient musician Harold Budd returns with what could be described as an ambient concept album, featuring eleven tracks surrounding the mysterious Jane. ‘Jane 1-11’ is an interesting ambient experience, in that it offers just a little bit more than ambient drones and gentle piano melodies, and instead offers eleven tracks of seemingly different branches of ambient music. It is an interesting experience, and one that certainly shows some incredible creativity from Budd. Whilst the diversity might be enjoyable to some though, I find it is just a little disappointing, as it means there’s less room for specific style of Budd’s that I find most enjoyable.

‘Jane 1-11’ indulges in a number of ambient styles, incorporating many elements that are perhaps a little unusual, but certainly interesting in painting an overall picture. It does seem that ‘Jane 1-11’ is a concept album that explores one individual character, and is expressed purely through the use of instrumental music. Due tot he diversity of the music itself, and perhaps the fact that it is entirely instrumental, it creates a wonderful mysterious idea that makes it hard to determine the specific words of the story, though the overall story is somewhat understandable. There’s some lovely pieces on ‘Jane 1-11’ that can even be enjoyed as stand-alone music, and not just enjoyed in the overall structure of the album. It’s some impressive writing at times, as each track seems key to the overall album, but there’s enough in them to just be enjoyed for what they are.

Whilst there are many enjoyable, and commendable elements to ‘Jane 1-11’, I find it just doesn’t hit the right note with me. The diversity in the tracks certainly can keep you on your toes, but I find it creates an almost frustrating element, as enjoyable drones and notes are replaced by other various instrumentals that are less enjoyable. This is perhaps the point of ‘Jane 1-11’, in order to create the overall story, but I find that it just doesn’t work at times for me, and that it results in some tracks that are perhaps forgettable. It’s commendable to Harold Budd to at least be trying things, but there’s perhaps a little too much experimentation here.

‘Jane 1-11’ is certainly a good album, and it is nice to see Harold Budd creating wonderful stories through ambient music. Whilst it is enjoyable, it just doesn’t work for me on a few levels. Perhaps the experimentation is on purpose to create mysterious levels that build up the story, and if this is the case, it is interesting, but just something that doesn’t work for me personally. It’s impossible to say that ‘Jane 1-11’ is a bad album, as it is essentially just a lovely ambient album. I would just say that I find some of Harold Budd’s previous work much more preferable to his latest album.

Album Rating:

  • ★★★☆☆  3/5

Selected Songs:

  • Jane 2
  • Jane 5
  • Jane 8
  • Jane 11

Harold Budd’s latest album ‘Jane 1-11’ is out now. 

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Yeezus – Kanye West

Kanye West’s latest offering seems to be another indulgence into the styles he clearly enjoys, whilst also offering a more minimalist approach. ‘Yeezus’, the latest rap album by Kanye West, seems every bit as minimalist as the questioning packaging surrounding the album. On his latest album, West opts for more subdued instrumentals, incorporating a number of experimental effects and ideas that help push along the album. There’s some interesting elements at work on ‘Yeezus’, which whilst also being somewhat minimalist (or as minimalist as the rap genre can become perhaps), it is also a somewhat dark and aggressive help, straying away from some of Kanye West’s previous material. It is enjoyable, though to a certain degree, a little bit polarizing.

It’s a shame that the rap genre get’s bastardized by artists who just shove lazy writing into lazy instrumentals, and create albums that have no impact or depth. It seems Kanye West opts for more creative directions when producing material, which sets him apart from many other artists. ‘Yeezus’ incorporates many elements that to some extent, have been overused and are now somewhat of a gimmick, and yet they seem to work well to present the overall theme of the album itself. There’s very little that is out of place on ‘Yeezus’, which seems to just go from strength to strength. It is an interesting album, that is certainly a step in a new direction, straying away from previous releases, such as the 2010 release ‘My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy’, or one of his strongest releases, 2007’s ‘Graduation’. ‘Yeezus’ can be seen as incorporating many of Kanye’s typical elements, but it still seems to draw upon new influences or ideas, creating an experience that is somewhat harsh, a bit minimalist and somewhat visceral.

‘Yeezus’ is an enjoyable album, and it is refreshing to see artists using the rap genre to the best of its capabilities. What is interesting though is how Kayne has released what is a very short album, in a genre that spawns many hour-long albums. At 40 minutes in length, ‘Yeezus’ is one of Kayne West’s shortest albums. To die-hard fans, it might leave them unsatisfied, as they yearn for more material on the album. I personally find the length of ‘Yeezus’ to be appealing, as it becomes an album that doesn’t outstay its welcome, and instead satisfies with each of its songs. It does also seem though, that a few of the tracks don’t pull off all their tricks in fine style, and instead come across as a bit gimmicky. On some tracks, these gimmicks work well, although it seems that a few other gimmicks just aren’t pulled off as well as they should do.

Kanye West certainly knows how to create interesting, and somewhat artistic albums. ‘Yeezus’ is certainly in league of many of Kanye’s earlier releases, although whether or not it is better than some of his previous albums is up to the fans. It certainly deserves to stand alongside them, and also shows Kanye West’s creativity as an artist. There’s many enjoyable tracks, and very interesting themes that are interwoven into the album. It is perhaps a little challenging at times, though I feel that that is all part of the fun of ‘Yeezus’.

Album Rating:

  • ★★★★☆  4/5

Selected Songs:

  • Black Skinhead
  • New Slaves
  • I’m In It
  • Blood On The Leaves

Kanye West’s sixth studio album ‘Yeezus’ is out now.

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Rudy Warman Demo – Rudy Warman

Self-expression is one of the main keys in the singer-songwriter format, for without it, you simply end up with an album of material that has no real means or direction. When singer-songwriters perform material that expresses themselves, it gives their music the appeal that makes it simply listenable. The demo by Rudy Warman, featuring 5 tracks, seems to communicate the ideas and feelings of himself, making it a great forerunner for what is inevitably more to come. Whilst there is an incredibly amateur sound to the material on the demo, it still expresses some nice ideas that will hopefully become the core of Rudy Warman’s debut release.

Rudy Warman’s demo tape serves the brilliant purpose of showing us what he has to offer the music scene, and the singer-songwriter genre. Rudy Warman’s demo opens up with gentle acoustic melodies accompanied by his own voice. Much of the demo follows in the same suit, and to some extent it isn’t very different from what we’d expect in the genre itself. However, Rudy Warman’s style makes the music itself very appealing. There’s some nice diversity in the tracks as well, as a few offer gentle and relaxing experience, and others offer a more built up and energetic experience. The demo is certainly limited by the fact that is simply a demo tape, meaning that everything is tinged in a lo-fi and amateur sound. The amateur sound does limit the capabilities of Rudy Warman’s expression on his demo tape, meaning Rudy Warman himself has to push his own talents as much as possible. The demo is certainly nice, if perhaps limited by the amateur sound. What is encouraging is that this particular area will instantly be improved once Rudy Warman gets around to producing his first debut release.

Rudy Warman is definitely on the right track. His demo tape is certainly above the average cut of singer-songwriter performances, and certainly demonstrates some nice talent at work. There’s some very charming and nice songs on the demo, making the whole demo tape a very nice experience. It certainly presents a taster of what the sound of Rudy Warman will be, and hopefully we’ll get to hear a much more fleshed out and versatile version. Right now, Warman simply needs to expand upon his sound and continue to be a hard-working musician. Hopefully we’ll get to hear a debut release from the musician, which will show us the true capabilities.

Album Rating:

  • ★★★☆☆  3/5

Selected Songs:

  • Lullaby
  • Heaven In Your Eyes

For more information on Rudy Warman, visit the website: http://www.rudywarman.co.uk/

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Centralia – Mountains

Ambient drones seem to work hand in hand with post-rock, allowing any such artist who indulges in both genres to present either genre in a more interesting and versatile way. Mountains is one such band, whose albums featuring long relaxing drones are interspersed with post-rock tracks that bring in some unusual intensity. It gives Mountains as a band an incredible amount of appeal, as their albums seem to stray away from the incredibly typical conventions of both ambient albums and post-rock albums, and instead combine the best elements of both genres until it creates the sound Mountains are going for. This comes through brilliantly on their latest effort ‘Centralia’, which demonstrates some incredible strengths.

The combination of ambient and post-rock elements isn’t anything new, and in fact is a technique most bands in the post-rock genre seems to do. What separates these bands from Mountains is how Mountains seem to combine all the best elements of the genres, presenting an album that goes from strength to strength. Mountains open up with gentle washing of ambient instrumentals that linger on for incredible lengths, before interpolating more traditional post-rock elements, incorporating wonderful guitar lines that bring in an element of intensity that is not shown for the first half of the album. Mountains demonstrate brilliant understanding of intensity and emotion, presented through instrumental music, and use their talents to achieve this means in fine style. There’s very little that is truly wrong with ‘Centralia’, which just seems to have many working elements and very few weak ones, especially in the music itself.

‘Centralia’ has many wonderful elements, and fans of post-rock music will find a lot to be enjoyed on this album. It seems though that there might be some polarizing elements, considering that the album seems to go from ambient to post-rock in what others might deem a somewhat sudden change. The shift in intensity seems to give the album it’s appeal and mystery, though it might perhaps polarize other listeners who were becoming absorbed by whatever element has suddenly disappeared. It is arguable that Mountains has made this work well for their album ‘Centralia’, though whether this wins over everybody is anyone’s guess. Whilst Mountains also demonstrate some brilliant talent and understanding of instrumental music, it might be argued that there isn’t anything truly special on ‘Centralia’, even though it’s many elements work. Most of what is present on ‘Centralia’ has been done before and (to some extent) has been done better as well by other bands. It might be arguable that Mountains might need to expand upon their many talents to truly make themselves stand out within the genre.

It seems Mountains have crafted what is simply a wonderful album, featuring brilliant instrumentals that encompass many strong elements of ambient and post-rock. There’s an incredible amount of emotion present in some of the songs, backed up with brilliant intensity that keeps the album going from track to track. Regardless of whether ‘Centralia’ is a special album, it still demonstrates some brilliant talent by the band Mountains. There is technically nothing the band is doing wrong, and thus all they really need to do is just continue what they’re already doing, but make sure that they don’t allow their sound to become stale or boring. I doubt whether it will come to that, as I’m sure Mountains are already on the right track.

Album Rating:

  • ★★★★☆  4/5

Selected Songs:

  • Identical Ship
  • Circular C
  • Propeller
  • Liana

Mountains’ latest album ‘Centralia’ is out now.

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Invisible Empire // Crescent Moon – KT Tunstall

Whilst the name implies that this might be a double-album, it is in fact simply another one of KT Tunstall’s charming and at times, amusing acoustic-tinged albums. ‘Invisible Empire // Crescent Moon’ marks Tunstall’s return to a more gentle sound, straying away from the almost rock elements of her previous work. There’s many enjoyable elements on ‘Invisible Empire // Crescent Moon’, with the music being gentle in tone and relaxing in nature. Though sporting a rather pedantic name, there’s some nice material here, suggesting that KT Tunstall is perhaps taking a further step in terms of her song-writing.

‘Invisible Empire // Crescent Moon’ encompasses the simplicity of song-writing, with gentle guitar melodies softly soaring into the fray, often accompanied by equally gentle instrumentals. The album’s entirety seems to feature much of the same style of music, with nothing ever building up into big rock numbers. It seems the album is, to some extent, lacking the diversity and range of some of Tunstall’s previous work, but it seems the presentation of ‘Invisible Empire // Crescent Moon’ works in its favor. Everything sounding gentle and relaxed works well for the overall album itself, presenting it as a nice album experience, featuring a wonderful flow from song to song. It is some of KT Tunstall’s more interesting song-writing to date, and perhaps some of her nicest.

It seems KT Tunstall is certainly one of the singer-songwriters who is thinking of albums in an overall sense, rather than writing good songs and compiling them together. Each song works in presenting the album’s themes and stories, and for the most part it is rather nice. It seems though that whilst ‘Invisible Empire // Crescent Moon’ is certainly enjoyable and nice, it is just perhaps a little bit… bland, in places. The rather down-tempo nature of each of the songs presents it as a relaxing experience, though it is marred by what seems to be just a dull sound that isn’t truly interesting. A few tracks work well, and might perhaps be some of KT Tunstall’s better songs in her repertoire. However, the vast majority of the songs seem just boring and plain, despite working well for the overall album experience.

There’s both enjoyable and un-enjoyable elements on ‘Invisible Empire // Crescent Moon’, it does seem to verge on the border of being one of KT Tunstall’s better albums. Even though the album features an incredibly pretentious title that, it still features some good presentation and song-writing. It is perhaps an album that is somewhat above average, but it is by no means a phenomenal or brilliant album. An enjoyable one perhaps, that at least has a comfortable and relaxing flow. I can’t say whether or not I’d expect any better from KT Tunstall, though at the very least, she has not disappointed with her latest album. Perhaps future her future material will reach a brilliant calibre that is incredibly impressive, but at least for now, there is nothing that is truly been done wrong.

Album Rating:

  • ★★★☆☆  3/5

Selected Songs:

  • Made Of Glass
  • Carried
  • Waiting On The Heart
  • No Better Shoulder

KT Tunstall’s fourth studio album ‘Invisible Empire // Crescent Moon’ is out now. 

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Hortus Conclusus – Castleview

I find often with my reviews, I slate bands or artists that use repetitive qualities, going over themselves and using the same section over and over until it becomes grating. However, I find that this only applies for certain genres, and that in the ambient genre, the repetition of certain elements is what gives the genre itself some of its strengths. It’s odd, considering how for most genres, repetition just shuts me off, whereas in ambient music, a certain note can repeat itself over and over and still work well for the song itself. In the case of ambient artist Castleview, the latest album encompasses many of the drone aspects of ambient music, and thus features some repetitive qualities that give the music itself some form of strength.

The latest album by Castleview titled ‘Hortus Conclusus’ features four tracks, ranging from 4 minutes in length to 14 minutes. It is simply everything an ambient album should be, with drones washing in like waves, and hanging around for the vast majority of the tracks. What is unusual is how (like most ambient tracks in a way), there’s very little diversity in terms of the actual sounds being heard,  but overall there seems to be a great shape to the tracks themselves. The whole album seems to fall into the ethereal part of the mind, and just hang around before becoming absorbed into the background noise. It becomes relaxing and pleasant, which is the essence of ambient music itself. If any criticism is to be found, it could be mentioned that Castleview don’t seem to demonstrates as much diversity as some ambient acts such as Brian Eno and Stars of the Lid, who seem to utilize drones and noise and create different sounding movements. Castleview instead seems to opt for tracks that not only repeat many elements in themselves, but also sound similar to each other. I’d find that if this was any other genre, I’d be waving my stick around and complaining profusely, but simply because it is ambient music, I am finding myself simply enjoying the music, and enjoying the drones and sounds being created by Castleview, which all becomes incredibly pleasant and relaxing.

There’s many elements to be enjoyed on ‘Hortus Conclusus’, which encompasses many brilliant elements of ambient music. There’s a wonderful relaxing element to the music which has a calming soothing effect. In essence, there isn’t anything that Castleview need to do more of technically, as his music seems to do the talking for him. The relaxing and calming drones build up and come down in wonderful style in the four tracks, which all compliment each other brilliantly, giving ‘Hortus Conclusus’ a wonderful character and shape. Those who enjoy music that is simply relaxing and interesting will find music to enjoy from Castleview, and their latest album.

Album Rating:

  • ★★★★☆  4/5

Selected Songs:

  • Sapphire
  • Pyramid

Castleview’s latest album ‘Hortus Conclusus’ is out now, and can be purchased at the band’s bandcamp page available at: http://castleview.bandcamp.com/

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Kveikur – Sigur Rós

With re-invention comes the possibility of alienating fans of previous musical styles. Sigur Rós 2012 release ‘Valtari’ was a beautiful ambient experience that tugged at the heartstrings as it progressed along its ethereal journey. Since then, Sigur Rós have lost a member, and have now produced a follow-up album titled ‘Kveikur’. On their latest album, Sigur Rós venture into a completely different area of music that features incredibly dark ambiance and possibly some of Sigur Rós’ most visceral music to date. ‘Kveikur’ sees Sigur Rós reinventing themselves musically, and trying new directions that are fairly new to the band. It is an album that is ultimately different to what we know from Sigur Rós, though it is one that is incredibly rewarding.

Sigur Rós demonstrates more brilliant creativity that seems to expand upon the range Sigur Rós have demonstrated over the years. Once again, they have proven why they deserve to be one of the most important bands in the music scene today, with ‘Kveikur’ being another strong addition to their near-perfect discography. The new direction taken by the band remains an interesting one, and one that is vastly different in sound and dynamics from their previous album. ‘Kveikur’ opens up in what could be described as an incredibly cinematic way that is full of force and power. It sounds almost like something from Inception, with great big bass notes pounding through the songs, showing an incredible aggression to Sigur Rós. It is phenomenal and surpasses some of their previous releases.

‘Kveikur’ is sure to be a popular album, and one that is sure to gain them some new fans, as well as pleasing old fans. It seems though that the only people who might be disappointed with ‘Kveikur’ are those who were entrapped by the beautiful styling of ‘Valtari’. Sigur Rós’ previous record saw the band indulging in a much more quiet and ambient sound, that exuded emotion and beauty. It was one of the leading albums of 2012, and one that has seen a quick follow up with ‘Kveikur’. ‘Kveikur’ follows a much different path, and whilst it is powerful and amazing, it is somewhat disappointing considering how wonderful the previous album was. What is good though is that the radical change in sound gives ‘Kveikur’ the grounds to stand on it’s own merits.

There’s many strengths to ‘Kveikur’ which surpasses some of Sigur Rós’ previous works, and easily elevates their status as a creative band. There’s many forces at work on ‘Kveikur’ which all come together to present a visceral yet powerful album. The new sound being experimented with by the band has been covered extremely well, with Sigur Rós embracing it and utilizing the many strengths that it offers, creating another one of Sigur Rós many great albums. Considering the radical change though, from ‘Valtari’ to ‘Kveikur’, I wouldn’t be surprised if ‘Kveikur’ was followed up by an equally experimental album. Whatever sound Sigur Rós use though, I’m sure it will work in fine form for them.

Album Rating:

  • ★★★★☆  4/5

Selected Songs:

  • Brennisteinn
  • Ísjaki
  • Stormur
  • Rafstraumur

Sigur Rós seventh studio album ‘Kveikur’ is out now, and can be purchased on Itunes.

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The Weight Of Your Love – Editors

Editors seemed to be one of the indie-rock bands who were right in the forefront around five or so years ago. Bands like The Killers, Razorlight and Editors themselves, seemed to be storming the music scene with indie-rock albums. Then everything arguably faded away, leaving the bands in the hands of their fans. Subsequent albums by these various bands seem to display some ingenuity, but never quite reach the heights of their greatest moments. It’s satisfying then, when a band in particular seem to produce an album that is just worthy of their repertoire, and also reminds us why we fell in love with them in the first place. Editors’ fourth album is one that does just that, being (perhaps) one of their most rewarding albums so far in their career.

I’ve felt that Editors were one of those indie-rock bands who had an incredible amount of appeal, with Tom Smith’s baritone vocals providing incredible performances both live and on studio albums. There have been many enjoyable songs by Editors, though I’ve never warmed to their albums as a whole. Whilst there’s a great number of enjoyable songs, it seems their whole albums fall short, with the inclusions of songs that just fall short overall. Editors’ latest album ‘The Weight Of Your Love’ is perhaps one of their first to not fall short on every song, and instead is an incredibly interesting listen throughout. Editors seem to combine all the various styles they’ve learnt over the years into one big sound that features indie-rock anthems and dark synth-pop tracks, making a very diverse and interesting album. It is arguably one of their best since ‘An End Has A Start’, though it is perhaps ultimately more rewarding.

‘The Weight Of Your Love’ is by no means perfect though, and whilst it may be arguable one of Editors best albums so far, it still falls short just like many of their previous releases (albeit, it doesn’t fall as short). A few tracks on the album, whilst perhaps being interesting to some degree, seem to not fit in the overall structure of the album itself, and instead become a little forgettable as it progresses from track to track. I only find it frustrating considering that Editors are clearly capable of writing great songs, but they’re never consistent in writing great songs that last an entire album length.

Editors can still say they’ve done themselves proud, and have certainly shown a lot of progression since their earlier work. It is interesting how ‘The Weight Of Your Love’ seems to be a return back to Editor’s roots in music, whilst also featuring many of their new styles they’ve learnt over the years. In fairness to Editors, they’ve worked it well, creating an album that seemingly spans a few genres, but manages to combine them all with a great flow. There’s a lot to enjoy on ‘The Weight Of Your Love’, which should please fans of Editors, both of their old style, and their somewhat newer style.

Album Rating:

  • ★★★★☆  4/5

Selected Songs:

  • The Weight
  • What Is This Thing Called Love?
  • Nothing
  • Two-Hearted Spider

Editors’ fourth studio album ‘The Weight Of You Love’ is set for release on 1st July 2013.

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Doug Paton EP – Doug Paton

The singer-songwriter format is one that seems to be incredibly popular, and incredibly accessible to those looking to get involved in music. It’s a somewhat standard format, that is only really limited by the talents and creativity of the artist in question. Only those who have no charisma at all, and have nothing interesting to say, fall short and show weaknesses within the genre. In Doug Paton’s case, the upcoming musician shows off a wonderful creative style, both lyrically and musically, all of which is presented in 5 songs on his debut self-titled EP. Paton showcases a charming style that is gentle and lyrically interesting, all of which comes together brilliantly on his first EP release.

The ‘Doug Paton EP’ contains all of the fairly typical and to some extent, simple, styles of the singer-songwriter format. There seems to have been an emergence of these in the last few years, with some notable singer-songwriters being Ben Howard and Jake Bugg. The standard for the style certainly seems to have been elevated in the last few years, but it seems that all one needs is some simple honesty in their music. Doug Paton seems to come across as some genuine person, with there being some seemingly honest intentions with his music. It is simply charming and nice, and certainly draws you in as the EP progresses. The EP itself is one that is a wonderful introduction into the style of Doug Paton, as it is enough to gain a certain understanding of him, whilst also making you want more. It’s the simple purpose of the EP releases, and one that works well for Doug Paton. The main problem I see with Doug Paton’s music is that with there being so many singer-songwriters out there, is it enough to just be nice? Doug Paton’s music is enjoyable, and entertaining, but I wonder whether or not it is enough to strive above those who have preceded him. In fairness to Doug Paton, it is hard to tell on a debut EP release, and an album release will certainly paint the full picture for us.

The ‘Doug Paton EP’ is a charming, somewhat simplistic, but ultimately rewarding EP release, featuring gentle and enjoyable instrumentals combined with Doug Paton’s lovely style of performing. There’s enough on here to decide whether or not one likes or dislikes the music, and I for one find it to be very enjoyable. The music itself is just nice, with there being some sense of Doug Paton’s personality coming through with the music. It is early to make predictions about Doug Paton’s success, but I can’t help but feel that perhaps some will come to Doug Paton, and that he might be a name to keep an eye on in the coming years. I’d say all the young musician needs to do is just continue to be himself, and let his music do the talking for him.

Album Rating:

  • ★★★★☆  4/5

Selected Songs:

  • Young
  • All Or Nothing
  • Eyes Open

Doug Paton’s debut EP release is out now, and can be purchased on Itunes, and ordered at Doug Paton’s website available at: http://www.dougpantonmusic.com/

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